13 4 / 2014

simonist:

Forest Interior tutorial by dpaint

Here is a way to organize the complex information of an interior forest. This will work no matter what your rendering style happens to be. Whether you are an impressionist painter like me or a realist, the basic building blocks for the picture are the same the only difference is how far you want to carry the finish. This photoshop demo is based on a traditional painting I did a while back.


The challenge is to arrange the information to give you the illusion of space where no horizon is apparent. Forest scenes work best when you use clearings to establish a foreground or middle ground to help divide space in the scene. It doesn’t matter if you are painting jungle or alpine forests the abstract qualities of design still apply.


It helps to visualize the anchor points of the composition first. These objects will have the most detail and can be flagged or spotlighted for greater effect. They will give your eye a place to go in the image allowing you to use areas of less detail as counterpoints.


I always start with large areas of color keyed to the average for that mass this helps to unify the shape. I set up the different layers and work between them to balance color value and shape. Once these are established to my liking I begin to develop and refine the painting adding interest as I go.

(via bleach-at-the-beach)

13 4 / 2014

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!

Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.

This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).

Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

(via trixdraws)

12 4 / 2014

pointetothesky:

Alphonse Mucha

"Alfons Maria Mucha (Ivančice, 24 July 1860 – Prague, 14 July 1939), often known in English and French as Alphonse Mucha, was a Czech Art Nouveau painter and decorative artist, known best for his distinct style. He produced many paintings, illustrations, advertisements, postcards, and designs."

(Source: mysticjc, via vincecarters)

10 4 / 2014

xfreischutz:

I’d also like to add that this is common points for all mammals as well, except that instead of their knees bending backwards it’s more that the long part of their legs is actually equivalent to the flat of our feet, and what we call their paws are actually what our toes are.

hope this helps! ;; and I hope that’s what you meant, but hey — understanding what you’re drawing means you can stylize it better, yeah?

I’d also like to add that the body shape really depends on the life of the species — for example, those that have strong wings will have a more top-heavy shape { because of muscles }, but chickens are more bottom-heavy.

(via doctopus)

09 4 / 2014

fucktonofanatomyreferencesreborn:

An adequate fuck-ton of hood-like references.

[From various sources]

09 4 / 2014

fucktonofanatomyreferencesreborn:

A wonderous fuck-ton of human hand references.

[From various sources]

09 4 / 2014

(Source: derpygrooves, via trixdraws)

08 4 / 2014

palidoozy-art:

Hey Anon! Sorry I took so long to answer this—I wanted to do something more in-depth over just a ‘ok draw a circle now MAKE IT AWSUM.’ I also tried to recall from other tutorials stuff in them I didn’t feel like they spoke about.

also—I’m very sorry I don’t have more advice to give about ears. I am not completely confident with them yet! Gotta keep practicing.

As always, I am not 100% correct on everything, so feel free to use what you want and ignore what you don’t want!

Here’s some more tutorials on noses and ears that might be helpful, if this one isn’t:

Step-by-step coloring nose tutorial

Another nose tutorial!

Ear tutorial by the same artist. This artist has TONS of other useful tutorials too, btw!

More noses.

(via yukoomori)

08 4 / 2014

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - More Acting Less AnatomyI’ve received a few message asking me how to draw simple generic characters (male, female) for story boarding, and what to do when there’s no character design. I will go over all that stuff, but I need to emphasize something first. I used to be obsessed with muscles and specific anatomy when I was drawing anything. Thanks to 90s superhero comic books and raging hormones, it kept me from embracing the storytelling aspect of sketching. Even later on in art school, I would spend WAY took much time on getting that perfect line quality. Animation Storyboarding squashed most of those inclinations out of me, and that’s good. I need to confess that I almost caved in and “cleaned up” the drawings on this page. This is how I draw when do a “first pass” or just trying to find ideas. That way, I don’t lose the energy or feel of my first instinct when approaching a sequence. Here’s something you’ll hear many times if you hang around story people: “It’s not about pretty drawings.” I agree and disagree to a certain extent, but the sentiment is right. It’s about telling a story and not letting other things (like lines, musculature, clothing, etc.) get in the way of doing so clearly.Once again, message me if you have requests for the next installments.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - More Acting Less Anatomy

I’ve received a few message asking me how to draw simple generic characters (male, female) for story boarding, and what to do when there’s no character design. I will go over all that stuff, but I need to emphasize something first. I used to be obsessed with muscles and specific anatomy when I was drawing anything. Thanks to 90s superhero comic books and raging hormones, it kept me from embracing the storytelling aspect of sketching. Even later on in art school, I would spend WAY took much time on getting that perfect line quality. Animation Storyboarding squashed most of those inclinations out of me, and that’s good. I need to confess that I almost caved in and “cleaned up” the drawings on this page. This is how I draw when do a “first pass” or just trying to find ideas. That way, I don’t lose the energy or feel of my first instinct when approaching a sequence. Here’s something you’ll hear many times if you hang around story people: “It’s not about pretty drawings.” I agree and disagree to a certain extent, but the sentiment is right. It’s about telling a story and not letting other things (like lines, musculature, clothing, etc.) get in the way of doing so clearly.

Once again, message me if you have requests for the next installments.

Norm

(via syderp)

08 4 / 2014

sifu-kisu:

Antique c. 1800s vampire killing kit
This is an authentic early-1800s vampire killing kit and includes all of the items original to it. As you can see, no simple task, the killing of vampires. I suspect this was a Priest’s kit, also useful for exorcism, etc..
But the presence of pistol with silver bullets is exceptionally interesting, don’t you agree?

sifu-kisu:

Antique c. 1800s vampire killing kit

This is an authentic early-1800s vampire killing kit and includes all of the items original to it. As you can see, no simple task, the killing of vampires. I suspect this was a Priest’s kit, also useful for exorcism, etc..

But the presence of pistol with silver bullets is exceptionally interesting, don’t you agree?

(via elleoser)